Book review: The Search for TK, by Bobbi J.G. Weiss

Weiss, Bobbi J. G. The Search for TK. (Ride series, #3) Candlewick Entertainment, 2018. $7.99. ISBN 9780763698577. 263 pages. Ages 12+. P7 Q6

Kit’s horse, TK has been taken away because he is dangerous. For Kit, who had to overcome obstacles to ride her horse, it is devastating. The main plot revolves around finding a way to get TK back. As Kit is doing research for a project, she realizes some information she knew about her mother (who passed away before book 1) is not true, which leads to some loose ends and a mystery that might be resolved in the next sequel. The first few chapters summarize what has happened in book one and two. Without reading the first two books the reader doesn’t fully grasp the relationships between the various characters. The book does not have a lot of substance; however, it will appeal to youth who like horses. Though the book is the third book in the series, it can stand alone. The book sets up for another sequel.

Verdict: Since the book is made from a Nickelodeon movie, it may be popular with teens. I found the book shallow and not of much substance.

November 2018 review by Tami Harris.

Advertisements

Book review: The Snowflake Mistake, by Lou Treleaven and Maddie Frost (illustrator)

Treleaven, Lou. The Snowflake Mistake. Illustrator, Maddie Frost. UK version.  Maverick Arts Publishing, 2016. $19.07. ISBN 9781848862180. Unpaged. Ages 4-8. P7 Q7

The Snow Queen puts snowflakes through a machine, squish and crunch, to make perfect identical snowflakes. Young Princess Ellie would much rather play. The Snow Queen has business to do so she has Princess Ellie man the machine. The machine is broken! What can Princess Ellie do bring back the snow? With the help of her bird friends, Princess Ellie finds a solution. In the end, Princess Ellie realizes that when things do not go as planned, one can rely on their own creativity to improve the situation.  Whimsical winter scenes with blues purples and green create a cozy, warm feeling.  The text includes onomatopoeia in bold words adding a sense of action to the story. Includes a pattern on how to make snowflakes.

Verdict: It is okay to make mistakes, in fact, sometimes mistakes can make things better. Embracing creativity and support for thinking outside the box. The story leaves you feeling warm and inspired.

November 2018 review by Tami Harris.

Book review: I Like My Car, by Michael Robertson

Robertson, Michael. I Like My Car. Holiday House Publishing, 2018. $15.99. ISBN 9780823439515. Unpaged. Ages 4-6. P6 Q7

Full of colorful, large illustrations, and repetitious text, “I like my __ car.” Each page shows a whimsical animal in an oversized car. There is a large amount of space around the text so it stands out. Readers can look at the color of the car to help them decode the text if needed. Arrows on signs show the directions the cars are traveling. On the last page, all the cars and animal drivers are included. Glossy pages with many different colors makes reading fun. In the I like to read series.  Guided B reading level, which is K-1. End pages have colorful, cartoon type car related illustrations.

Vedict: For children who are learning to read and who like cars, this book is fun. Since the book is repetitious, adult readers may tire of the book quickly. It is meant for children as they are learning to read.

November 2018 review by Tami Harris.

Book review: Mad, Mad Bear!, by Kimberly Gee

Gee, Kimberly. Mad, Mad Bear! Beach Lane Books, 2018. $17.99. ISBN 9781481449717. Unpaged. Ages 3-5. P7 Q7

Bear gets mad because he has to leave the park first, then he gets an owie on the way home and has to leave his boots and favorite stick outside. He doesn’t feel it is fair and he gets mad! After he throws a tantrum, he takes a deep breath, has a snack and takes a nap. When Bear wakes up, he feels better. Simple text and large illustrations follow Bear as he goes through the process of getting mad and calming down. Some words are red and large, emphasizing them. Illustrations show Bear’s facial expressions, giving the listener clues to how Bear is feeling. The book is designed to be read to small children.

Verdict: If you have child who gets mad often, this book will provide some simple strategies and show that they can recover from their mad feelings. I recommend this book for small children and public libraries.

November 2018 review by Tami Harris.

Book review: Rocks, by Claudia Martin

Martin, Claudia. Rocks (Discover our World series). Quarto Publishing, 2018. $26.65. ISBN 9781682973974. 24 pages. Ages 7-10. P7 Q7

Have you ever wondered how rocks are formed? The reader will learn about rocks, sand, caves, minerals, metals, gems and fossils. Text boxes with facts are set in photographs showing a visual of the facts, engaging the reader and enlightening them further. The reader can move from chapter to chapter based on their interest, the book does not need to be read straight through. This format makes the book easier for children to read. In the Discover our World series, this book includes an index, table of contents and glossary.

Verdict: For children who are interested in rocks, this book provides many facts and photographs that will broaden their knowledge. I recommend this book for elementary school and public libraries. Teachers and homeschool families will find this book valuable.

November 2018 review by Tami Harris.

Book review: I Just Like You, by Suzanne Bloom

Bloom, Suzanne. I Just Like You. Boyds Mills Press, 2018. $16.95. ISBN 9781629798783. Unpaged. Ages 3-6. P7 Q7

Acceptance of one who is different from oneself is important for children to learn. A diverse group of animals show how each animal can be different or the same and still like each other. Simple repetitious text drives the point. Adults can use this book to segway into what ways we are different and what ways we are the same. Illustrations show friendly animals interacting with each other. Children often think their friends have to be just like them. This book shows that they can like others even if they are different.

Verdict: I highly recommend this playful book that models liking each other. I will use this book in my character ed class.

November 2018 review by Tami Harris.

Book review: Quiet, by Tomie dePaola

dePaola, Tomie. Quiet. Simon & Schuster, 2018. $17.99. ISBN 9781481477543. Unpaged. Ages 4-6. P5 Q6

In a world where everyone is in a hurry, being still and quiet may be a foreign concept. A grandfather points out to his two grandchildren how everything is in such a hurry; bees, birds, a dog, a dragon fly, and trees waving leaves. He invites them to sit quietly with him on a bench. He points out birds resting in a tree, dog resting, frog sitting, and the dragon fly stopped. The girl observes that she can think when she is quiet, the boy can see when he is still. To be quiet and still is a special thing. The book felt a bit generic, since the characters are referred to as boy, girl, and grandfather. With simple text and large calm colored illustrations, this gentle book showing the importance of being still and quiet. Even though it shows a balance of busy and quiet, it emphasizes that being quiet is more important than being busy. In life, I feel that one needs to have a balance of both and both are equally important.

Verdict: I can see adults reading this book to children to show them the importance of being quiet and still, but I do not see children picking up this book on their own to read. I do not think this is a book that children will want to read over and over.  That being said, I feel this book would be valuable in a public library. An adult could use this book to lead into an activity where children see what they notice when they are quiet.

November 2018 review by Tami Harris.