Book review: The Treasure of Pirate Frank, by Mal Pete and Elspeth Graham, illustrated by Jez Tuya

Peet, Mal and Elspeth Graham. The Treasure of Pirate Frank. Illustrated by Jez Tuya. Nosy Crow, 2018. $15.99. ISBN 9780763696443. Unpaged. Ages 4-8. P8 Q9

If you love color, adventure and surprise endings, you will love The Treasure of Pirate Frank. Written in the format of This is the House that Jack Built, a boy wants to find the treasure of Pirate Frank. He follows a treasure map through the sea that must be sailed, the island of spice and gold, the snowy mountain, the forest where monkeys swing, the swamp where bullfrogs sing, the steps that go higher, the volcano that spits out fire, the tree that marks the spot, and then he runs into Pirate Frank. But Pirate Frank is not what he expected! Quick, Run! And he runs all the way back into his ship, where he dreams about his adventures. Children will be delighted as “Frank” chases the boy all the way back to his ship. The front cover has the treasure in shiny gold. The map inside the book accurately shows the path the boy follows to find the treasure.

Verdict: Children will enjoy the adventure the boy goes on to find the treasure and will be delighted to find out who Pirate Frank is. I highly recommend this book for elementary age libraries. With bright and colorful illustrations and repetitive text, children will want it read over and over.

April 2018 review by Tami Harris.

Advertisements

Book review: Superhero Dad, by Timothy Knapman, illustrated by Joe Berger

Knapman, Timothy. Superhero Dad. Illustrated by Joe Berger.  Nosy Crow, 2015., unp. $15.99.                    ISBN:978-0-7636-8657-4. Gr.2+. P8 Q8

knapman-superhero-dadAs a little boy, my son Ryan idealized my husband. Ryan loved the Ghosts Busters and he and his dad would go out at night to look for ectoplasm. He would be excited as he came in as he found oil from our car on the cement and proclaimed it to be ectoplasm. I treasured these moments and the relationship that they had, Superheroddad offers the same experience to me once again as I saw the wonder that a small boy has towards his dad. It is the brightly colored illustrations that help to carry the wonder of the young boy who see his dad as a Superhero. It is the final page that made me cry as the father sees his own child as a superhero. Verdict: this book would be a great read aloud just before Father’s Day or for teachers to use in a unit on families.

November 2016 review by Carol Bernardi.

Book review: Use Your Imagination (But Be Careful What You Wish For), by Nicola O’Byrne

O’Byrne, Nicola. Use your imagination (but be careful what you wish for). Nosy Crow, 2014. unp. $15.99. ISBN:978-0-7636-8001-5. Gr. K+. P8 Q8

OByrne Use Your ImaginationLittle brown bunny meets the big bad wolf. The only thing that will save the bunny from the wolf is to use his imagination. The bunny finds all sorts of things to defeat the wolf but they just don’t seem to be enough to save him. That is until the bunny thinks of a space rocket that he uses to blast the wolfx into outer space. The wolf doesn’t think that rabbit has used his imagination very well as the rocket takes off. The rabbit however is extremely pleased. The text of the book is written in different styles and sizes of fonts which emphasizes the story. The illustrations by O’Byrne are done in mixed media and will delight the reader as these two try to outwit each other.

February 2016 review by Carol Bernardi.

Book review: Dinosaur Rocket!, by Penny Dale

Dale, Penny. Dinosaur Rocket! Nosy Crow, 2015. $15.99. ISBN 978-0-7636-7999-6. Unp. Ages 1-5 P9 Q8

Dale Dinosaur RocketThe end papers have colorful drawings of many different dinosaurs and their different names, so the adult reading this to young children can use this story as an opportunity to teach the names of different dinosaurs. The story is very simple about dinosaur astronauts blasting off to be the first dinosaurs on the face of the moon. I like how the dinosaurs stomp around and children might enjoy stomping along with the dinosaurs which may get kids moving during circle time.

December 2015 review by Melinda Dye.

Book review: Nuts in Space, by Elys Dolan

Dolan, Elys. Nuts in space. Nosy Crow, an imprint of Candlewick Press, 2015. unp. $17.99. ISBN:978-0-7636-7609-4. Gr. 3+. P9 Q9

Dolan Nuts in SpaceWhat a hoot this book was. I laughed all the way through and reread it again as it was so enjoyable. From the first page the author caught my attention as the elite crew of animals have finally found the “Lost Nuts of Legend.” Now homeward bound with their grand find they discover that their food supply is almost exhausted. So begins an arduous journey to find food and the way home. One crew member, the squirrel however is so hungry that he eats the “Nuts of Legend.” This story will appeal to younger students, but it will also appeal to older students as the book has a feel of the “Stars Wars” movie. The first thing that the reader sees are words that scroll across the page, that are reminiscent of the opening of Star Wars films. “In a galaxy far, far….”

September 2015 review by Carol Bernardi

Book review: Captain Beastlie’s Pirate Party, by Lucy Coats, illustrated by Chris Mould

Coats, Lucy. Captain Beastlie’s Pirate Party. Illustrated by Chris Mould. Nosy Crow, 2014. $15.99. ISBN 978-0-7636-7399-4. 24 pages. Ages 3-7. P7Q8

Coats Captain Beastlies Pirate PartyCaptain Beastlie is a very dirty and smelly pirate while his shipmates are very clean and organized. For a birthday surprise they clean him up and dress him in a new suit and all is well until he drops cake on it. This is a fun book about keeping yourself clean so that those around you are happy.

December 2014 review by Beverly Minard.

Book review: Love Always Everywhere, by Sarah Massini.

Massini, Sarah. Love Always Everywhere. Nosy Crow, an imprint of Random House, 2014. $16.99. 9780385375528. Unp. Ages 1-5. P9 Q7

Massini Love Always EverywhereThis is a very cute book for toddlers that explores many different kinds of love. There is shy love, proud love, lost love, and loud love…Children will enjoy the illustrations of other kids playing and interacting with each other. It is a very sweet story with soft illustrations. Like its precursor, Books Always Everywhere, the text is rhyming, minimal, and best read aloud. March 2015 review by Lillian Curanzy.