Book review: Girl Running: Bobbi Gibb and the Boston Marathon, by Annette Bay Pimentel, illustrated by Micha Archer

Pimentel, Annette Bay. Girl Running: Bobbi Gibb and the Boston Marathon. Illus. by Micha Archer. Nancy Paulsen/Penguin, 2018. $17.99. unp. ISBN 978-1-101-99668-3. Ages 5-8. P9Q9

Seventy years after the inception of the Boston Marathon, women were still prevented from participation. When 23-year-old Roberta Louise “Bobbi” Gibb applied to take part, she received a letter stating that “women are not physiologically able to run twenty-six miles and furthermore the rules do not allow it.” She had already spent years training and would not allow herself to be refused. Wearing a hooded sweatshirt, she jumped out of the bushes at the beginning and began the first woman to run the race. Archer’s illustrations of oil paint and collage with tissue paper and hand-stamped patterned papers show Gibb’s hard work as she literally ran across the country, her perseverance running in six Boston marathons before receiving official sanction, the speed of the runners, and encouragement from competitors and observers once they discover that a girl is running the race. The information in the book comes from Gibb, now an artist.

Verdict: Girl Running is a welcome companion to last year’s The Girl Who Ran by Kristina Yee and Frances Poletti, illustrated by Susanna Chapman because of its emphasis on the joy of running and details such as her shoes. Also of interest is the mile markers and elevation indications that demonstrate the runners’ struggles, especially at Heartbreak Hill. Heartwarming and inspirational.

January/February 2018 review by Nel Ward.

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Book review: Les and Ronnie Step Out, by Andrew Kolb

Kolb, Andrew. Les and Ronnie Step Out.  Nancy Paulsen Books, 2017. $16.99. ISBN 9780399546198. Unpaged.  Ages 6-10. P8 Q8.

Les is a “straight-laced” leg while Ronnie is opposite.  Things change after Ronnie has a skateboarding accident.  Les misses the fun ways of Ronnie.  Les works to cheer up Ronnie.  So, Les wears one of Ronnie’s shoes and then acts like him.  He learns the valuable lesson of what it is like to be in “someone else’s shoes.” The first set of end pages show pictures of plain brown tied shoes on one side and on the opposing page silly colorful untied shoes.  The final end pages show one out of place in the plain brown tied shoes signifying the change that takes place in the book.

Verdict:  It is a good fit book for young readers and teaching in understanding differences in people.  Also, it portrays the two personality types A and B. It is a fun book for libraries, reading aloud, and discussing.

November 2017 review by Deborah Gwynn.

Book review: Ben’s Revolution: Benjamin Russell and the Battle of Bunker Hill, by Nathaniel Philbrick, illustated by Wendell Minor

Philbrick, Nathaniel. Ben’s Revolution: Benjamin Russell and the Battle of Bunker Hill. Il. by Wendell Minor. Nancy Paulsen/Penguin, 2017. $17.99. unp. ISBN 978-0-399-16674-7. Ages 7-11. P7Q9

The Battle of Bunker Hill, recounted in the author’s 2013 adult book about the 1775 British versus America encounter is the focus of this story of a 12-year-old boy who goes with his classmates to follow British troops toward Concord. His home in Boston is sealed off, and he becomes a clerk to the Revolutionary general Israel Putnam and watches the Battle of Bunker Hill.

Verdict: The narrative uses the myth that the Revolutionaries were protesting taxes instead of the opposition to the monopoly of the British East India Company, but the text is generally accurate and the story of Ben Russell entertaining, especially because the book is based on an actual person. Beautiful gouache and watercolor illustrations add to the depiction of the events, including the Boston Tea Party and the battles of Bunker Hill and Breed’s Hill in Charlestown. An excellent adaptation from an adult book to introduce young readers to an engaging person.

Summer 2017 review by Nel Ward.